5 Common Causes of Motorcycle Accidents in South Carolina

5 Common Causes of Motorcycle Accidents in South Carolina

It is autumn in South Carolina, which means more people are riding their motorcycles is the wonderful cooler air The federal government estimates that per mile traveled in 2014, the number of deaths on motorcycles was over 27 times the number in cars. Motorcycle accidents are more likely to cause serious injuries than a typical car accident.  Because of the potential risk of injury, it is important for every motorcycle rider to take safety seriously.  Safety begins with proper clothing and a helmet. Although helmets are not legally required in South Carolina for anyone over 21 years old, it is still a very good idea to make sure that you see tomorrow should you be in an accident.

Another way to stay safe is to be aware of common accident scenarios and how to avoid them. Some of these common  scenarios are as follows:

1. Someone turning left in front of the motorcycle.

One of the most common motorcycle accidents occurs when someone turns left in front of the motorcycle. The motorcycle driver has no choice but to hit the vehicle or lay the bike down.Your best chance of survival comes from slowing down as much as possible pre-collision, and you can do that best with the bike completely upright, using both brakes. Even if you only have time to lose 10-15 mph, that could be the difference in survival.

2. Lane splitting

Lane splitting is when a motorcycle driver drives between two lanes of slowly moving or stopped vehicles. This typically occurs in traffic jams). Accidents often occur when splitting lanes for a variety of factors that including: being closer to other vehicles than normal, other vehicles changing lanes when not expecting the motorcycle; and the reduced space the motorcycle has to maneuver.  In South Carolina, lane splitting is illegal. South Carolina motorcycle laws prohibit riders from practicing lane splitting. However, all motorcycles are entitled to full use of a lane and no motor vehicle shall be driven in such a manner as to deprive any motorcycle of the full use of a lane.

3. Speed

Speeding on a motorcycle gives the driver less time to react to new traffic and road conditions.  If a driver is speeding and all of a sudden comes upon gravel in the road or wet or ice conditions, he is in for an accident.  Slow down and stay aware.

4. Blind spots

Many motorcycle accidents are caused from motorcycle drivers riding in another vehicles blind spot.  If a driver can’t see you, they can’t avoid you. The best practice is to assume that no one can see you. Make sure to ride with your headlight on. It is the law in South Carolina.

5. Impairment

Operating a motorcycle requires skill and constant observation.  Being just a little impaired, even if it is below the legal limit, is still putting your life at risk when operating a motorcycle.

If you have questions about motorcycle accident, please contact Venus Poe today at 864-963-0310 click here to fill out an online case evaluation form. We have offices in Greenville, South Carolina and Fountain Inn, South Carolina to better serve you. Knowing all of your rights is imperative to make sure you are fully compensated after an accident. There is no obligation or charge for our initial consultation to see if we can help you with your accident case.

The information you obtain in this article is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should not read this article to propose specific action or address specific circumstances, but only to give you a sense of general principles of law. Application of these general principles to particular circumstances must be done by a lawyer who has spoken with you in confidence, learned all relevant information, and explored various options. Before acting on these general principles, you should hire a lawyer licensed to practice law in the jurisdiction in which you may have a case.